Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Ph.D.

I study people, technology, and the worlds they make

Lunch blog

I love this idea: a blog of kids’ lunches, courtesy of Mimi Ito. It’s proof that, as she and colleague put it elsewhere,

[T]he camera phone makes it possible to take and share pictures of the stream of people, places, pets and objects in the flow of everyday life.

Unlike the traditional camera, the camera phone is an intimate and ubiquitous presence that invites a new kind of personal awareness, a persistent alertness to the visually newsworthy that makes amateur photojournalists out of its users.

1 Comment

  1. Actually, I think it shows that the breathless navel-gazing fad called blogging is finally getting to the point of self-parody. All those underemployed geeks from the dot-com crash have glommed onto another fashionable silliness. I think as a historian and futurist you could find much material for study by analyzing this phenomenon. I’m particularly intrigued about the way Google’s weighting of pages based (in part) on incoming links has fundamentally shaped the mutual back-scratching nature of the tightly linked blogosphere.

    Or another topic of study could be the way stories spread like wildfire across hundreds of blogs in a small timeframe

    Or how a good part of blogging concerns none other than–the blogging phenomena

    Or, why does the blogger blog? A-listers: self-promotion of themselves, their companies, their political or philosophical agenda.
    B-listers: a glorified resume e.g. gawker.com which freely admits it won’t make money for a while but sure is a good way of staying relevant for somebody (N.D) who comes from the traditional publishing world. C-listers: moms with kids, maybe the only really interesting and original stuff out there

    Or, the way in which blog comments tend to be sympathetic and less-often critical or even honest. The commenters always take the point of view of the blogger

    A rich harvest of psychological, anothropological, social research. And academic too, in the sense that the whole thing is a study of meaninglessness…

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