• "Traditional thinking has held that it's best to make a public declaration, maybe even more than one. Enlisting others in your hopes will shore up your intentions, and motivate you to work toward your new-found goal. But is this folk wisdom sound? Psychologists have been exploring this question, and some recent studies are now raising doubts about the "going public" strategy. Indeed, it appears that some people may mistake the talking for the doing—and end up failing for lack of hard work."
  • "[C]onventional wisdom asserts that letting others know of your future plans makes you more likely to achieve them. There’s a logic behind this wisdom: speaking your intentions is an informal contract between you and your network. That contract creates accountability for your actions. The process makes some sense in theory. Yet the success involved in announcing your goals may not hold up in practice. As Wray Herbert explains, telling others of our goals may create a previously unforeseen barrier: ego inflation. In some situations, as recent psychological studies indicate, once we declare our goals to peers, colleagues, or friends, we think of ourselves in a different light. The informal contracts make us feel as if we’ve begun down the path to our goal, which can prevent us from taking further steps toward actually achieving it."