Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Ph.D.

I study people, technology, and the worlds they make

Camp Winnarainbow

The camp is about 200 miles away from here, so we started early in the morning, and made a couple leisurely stops, including one at Schat’s Bakery in Ukiah, which is a very nice place.


schat’s bakery and cafe, via flickr

Camp Winnarainbow is outside Laytonville, which is… basically the middle of nowhere. It’s very pretty, but awfully remote. Which is what you want in a camp, I suppose. Certainly the kids don’t complain about it.


camp winnarainbow entrance, via flickr

One of the first things the parents see when they arrive on pickup day is a vast field of lost/unclaimed shirts, sweatshirts, etc. My daughter managed to keep all her stuff, but she reported that a couple friends “accidentally lost” things that they had gotten tired of.


lost and found, via flickr

After lunch (which was outstanding), the kids put on a parade to welcome everyone. (That’s my daughter in the center of the picture, in the blue and red pants.)


opening parade, via flickr

After the parade there were performances on several stages. The acrobatics stage had some impressing stuff, including a Spanish web (the rope in the middle).


acrobatics, via flickr

Winnarainbow mainly teaches circus skills– stilts, tightrope, juggling (an art form that can be really beautiful) tumbling, clowning– but there’s also a lot of music.


rainbow stage, via flickr

In the two-week session there’s also an improv class, which my daughter took. I have a lot of respect for improvisational theatre– it’s a really intriguing mix of structure and creativity, and a great model for facilitation and workshops– so it was neat seeing her perform.

IMG_6467.JPG

Finally, we gathered her stuff (including two bags of snacks one of her grandmothers sent in a care package), and headed out. Her brother will be old enough to go next year, and I fully expect us to be back.


heading to the car, via flickr

We stopped for dinner in Hopwood at the Bluebird Cafe, an awesome little place we discovered last year.


bluebird cafe, via flickr

Yesterday we spent the day fetching my daughter from Camp Winnarainbow, where she’s spent the last two weeks. She spent a week there last year, and quite enjoyed it. This year she was there long enough to write us letters, which basically said, “Hello, I don’t miss any of you, and now I must go and walk on stilts.” (And here she is…)

The camp is about 200 miles away from here, so we started early in the morning, and made a couple leisurely stops, including one at Schat’s Bakery in Ukiah, which is a very nice place.


schat’s bakery and cafe, via flickr

Camp Winnarainbow is outside Laytonville, which is… basically the middle of nowhere. It’s very pretty, but awfully remote. Which is what you want in a camp, I suppose. Certainly the kids don’t complain about it.


camp winnarainbow entrance, via flickr

One of the first things the parents see when they arrive on pickup day is a vast field of lost/unclaimed shirts, sweatshirts, etc. My daughter managed to keep all her stuff, but she reported that a couple friends “accidentally lost” things that they had gotten tired of.


lost and found, via flickr

After lunch (which was outstanding), the kids put on a parade to welcome everyone. (That’s my daughter in the center of the picture, in the blue and red pants.)


opening parade, via flickr

After the parade there were performances on several stages. The acrobatics stage had some impressing stuff, including a Spanish web (the rope in the middle).


acrobatics, via flickr

Winnarainbow mainly teaches circus skills– stilts, tightrope, juggling (an art form that can be really beautiful) tumbling, clowning– but there’s also a lot of music.


rainbow stage, via flickr

In the two-week session there’s also an improv class, which my daughter took. I have a lot of respect for improvisational theatre– it’s a really intriguing mix of structure and creativity, and a great model for facilitation and workshops– so it was neat seeing her perform.

IMG_6467.JPG

Finally, we gathered her stuff (including two bags of snacks one of her grandmothers sent in a care package), and headed out. Her brother will be old enough to go next year, and I fully expect us to be back.


heading to the car, via flickr

We stopped for dinner in Hopland at the Bluebird Cafe, an awesome little place we discovered last year.


bluebird cafe, via flickr

7 Comments

  1. Excellent! I’m very impressed with Elizabeth on stilts (does she want some at home now?)

  2. She hasn’t said anything about stilts at home, but this morning as we were
    driving to school she DID lament the fact that Peninsula doesn’t have any
    stilts. (Interesting that she would draw the connection between Winnarainbow
    and Peninsula, not Winnarainbow and home.)

  3. Well, she did tell me she wanted to figure out how to build stilts at woodshop, but she is concerned that she does not know how to make the ties. I am concerned that mostly what they seemed to do was use duct tape to attach the stilts!

  4. Yeah, the duct tape would worry me too. But it seems to me that stilts are
    exactly the kind of slightly nerdy athletic activity– like juggling– that
    probably attracts a technically-savvy crowd, including people who’ve
    published extensively on DIY stilt manufacturing and attachments.

  5. liligracelove@yahoo.com

    February 8, 2010 at 9:22 am

    im in one of these pictures! GO CWR!

  6. It’s a fabulous place. Hope you had a great time!

  7. I’m late to the comment party, but to allay any fears- the stilts are tied to their feet with rope (really tightly), and velcro’d around their knees, the duct tape is just a precaution on top of those.

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