• "Nearly everyone reads. Soon, nearly everyone will publish. Before 1455, books were handwritten, and it took a scribe a year to produce a Bible. Today, it takes only a minute to send a tweet or update a blog. Rates of authorship are increasing by historic orders of magnitude. Nearly universal authorship, like universal literacy before it, stands to reshape society by hastening the flow of information and making individuals more influential."
  • "The trend [in adoption law]… is toward openness, a growing “right” to know. I am not against this trend. I simply want to give not-knowing its due. I like mysteries. I like the sense of uniqueness that comes from having unknown origins (however false that sense may be)."
  • Her great 2003 essay on computer versus human memory. "[E]ach new computer has enough disk space to hold everything you've ever stored on all the computers you've ever owned in your life. The equivalent would be a new house that, every time you moved, would be so much larger than all your past houses that all the furniture you've ever purchased would follow you, indefinitely…. everything–the rug you picked up at a garage sale after a tipsy brunch, that secondhand dining table bought hurriedly after the divorce–all of it, no escaping it, the joy or humiliation of every decorating decision you've ever made, the occasion that brought each object into your life perpetually, unflinchingly present: the brutality of the everlasting."