• Moves are afoot to use small satellites to facilitate the growth of Japan's aerospace industry.
  • "Scientists in The Aerospace Corporation's Micro/Nano Technology Department are fired up about the tiny glass demonstrator satellites they’ve been developing."
  • "Small satellites have been widely regarded as second-rate by Pentagon and intelligence community officials, who opt for massive, high-technology spacecraft lasting a decade or more in orbit. But the time may finally be at hand for skeptics to begin accepting smaller, simpler systems for some national security missions. If so, the face of the U.S. satellite industry could change dramatically because smaller satellites are less complex to build. If the barriers to entry into this market are lowered, the standard cast of Pentagon contractors could be joined by smaller, and potentially leaner, upstarts."
  • "Situational assessment is a critical element for emergency response systems. Since terrestrial-based sensing and communication systems may be compromised in the event of an attack or natural disaster, a small-satellite surveil- lance and tracking network is proposed as a low-cost, readily deployable solution. The University of Hawaii’s Small Satellite Program has developed a CubeSat-class picosatellite platform for performing terrestrial disaster detection and monitoring. This paper describes the development and demonstration of a 1.5U CubeSat with a geo-referenced imaging payload, and its ties to the responsive space field."
  • "TWO GENERATIONS of ultrasmall satellites developed by University of Hawaii students are sitting on the shelves waiting for launch. And a new and improved model is in the works."
  • "Blaine Murakami, a 22-year-old graduating senior at the Manoa campus, was awarded the 2005 Alton B. Zerby and Carl T. Koerner Outstanding Electrical and Computer Engineering Student Award by Eta Kappa Nu, the national electrical engineering society. In 2003 Aaron Ohta, who graduated from Manoa that year, received the same honor, and Kendall Ching received it in 2001. The common denominator has been electrical engineering associate professor Wayne Shiroma, who mentored all three. Shiroma, a former Hughes Aircraft satellite engineer before coming home to Hawai'i to teach, has involved all of them in construction and design of mini-satellites at UH, a project that also has immersed dozens of Manoa engineering students in real-life engineering experiences."