• Reflections on the journal Futures, and how to broaden the accessibility– and thus "democratise and rejuvenate the FS enterprise."
  • "This paper looks critically at the practice and relevance of future studies, from the point of view of the large poor and marginalised sections of humanity. It puts forward nine propositions on the methodological and political problems with future studies. Future studies is dominated by western, instrumental perspectives and by pro-rich and corporate concerns, and it ignores alternative cultural perspectives as well as the interests and concerns of the majority of human beings. Also, it is oriented little towards policy and praxis and, consequently, has had little impact on the course of changes in and the driving forces shaping the real world. While putting forward an agenda for futurists, the paper concludes that future studies can become more meaningful and relevant for the large mass of humanity only through a radical democratisation of political economy on the one hand and of the categories of knowledge on the other."
  • "According to a new study, counterfactual thinking — considering a ”turning point” moment in the past and alternate universes had it not occurred — heightens one’s perception of the moment as significant, and even fated. Armed with a sense that life may not be arbitrary, counterfactual thinkers are more motivated and analytical in organizational settings, the study suggests. 'What we found is that people indicate stronger commitment to an organization when they think counterfactually and it helps to define whothey are on a professional level,' says Haas School Associate Professor Laura Kray."
  • This paper looks at the growing confluence between sustainability thinking and futures thinking. Drawing on developments based on Integral Theory, it then looks at how an emerging Integral Sustainability (IS) promises to enhance theory and practice in the sustainability field. In particular, the paper looks at how IS makes sense of sustainability challenges from an ontological position based on perspectives in place of objects (and their systems). A framework is outlined for understanding how various sustainability perspectives are constructed. This framework is then used to analyse a range of general perspectives the authors have identified that relate to nuclear power as a response to climate change. The strength of the IS approach is considered in the context of ongoing debate in Australia over the appropriateness of developing a local nuclear power industry as a response to climate change.
  • "Anticipating the future is increasingly being seen as a useful way to align, direct and improve current organizational strategy. Several such 'future studies' have been produced which envision various construction industry scenarios which result from technological and socio-economic trends and influences…. Most studies fail to address the complexities and uncertainties of both the present and the future… fail to explore the connections between global, local, construction-specific and more widespread factors… [and] do not generate any significantly different advice or recommendations for the industry than those emerging from the much larger canon of non-future oriented construction research."
  • "This article explores the role of future studies in developing sustainable technologies within a co-evolutionary context. In the first section, it clarifies briefly the definition of sustainable development, complexity and co-evolution, in order to establish the frame within which the theoretical exploration will be carried out. The second section provides information about characteristics of sustainable technology development, which requires a radical shift from the current technological paradigm…. The third section reveals the relationship between technology development and future studies."
  • "A growing interest has emerged in the role that autobiographical memory retrieval plays in simulation of future events. Cognitive explorations in this domain have generally relied on cue word paradigms with instructions to develop specific (relating to one particular day) memories or future events…. The current study investigated similarities and differences in how participants spontaneously remember the past and imagine the future when the specificity constraints inherent in the cue word task are removed. A total of 93 undergraduate students completed two sentence-completion tasks, probing for past and future events. A number of differences emerged between past and future thought; in particular, they were less specific when simulating future events compared with past events. This reduction in specificity was the result of participants producing more future thoughts relating to extended lifetime periods and semantic associates."
  • "The ability to project oneself into the future has previously been found to be related to happiness and anxiety. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the causal effect of deliberate mental time travel (MTT) on happiness and anxiety. More specifically, we address whether purposely engaging in positive, negative, or neutral future MTT would lead to different levels of happiness and anxiety. Results show a significant increase of happiness for subjects in the positive condition after 2 weeks but no changes in the negative or neutral condition. Additionally, while positive or negative MTT had no effect on anxiety, engaging in neutral MTT seems to significantly reduce stress over 15 days. These findings suggest that positive future MTT is not just a consequence of happiness and might be related to well-being in a causal fashion and provide a new approach in happiness boosting and stress-reducing activities."
  • "This work documents important distinctions between thinking clearly and thinking frequently about one's future self. In Study 1, responses from 648 college students on a scale assessing future self thoughts revealed two factors, Clarity and Frequency, which differentially predicted measures of psychological functioning. Greater clarity predicted higher levels of positive states and attributes such as optimism and lower levels of negative states and attributes such as anxiety, whereas greater frequency predicted more anxiety and negative affect. Study 2 explored the roles of clarity and frequency in possible selves. Clarity predicted endorsing fewer negative possible future outcomes and greater psychological closeness to the hoped-for self. Frequency predicted listing more feared possible selves, feeling less capable of preventing the feared self, and thinking more frequently about possible selves. Implications for further understanding of self-system processes are discussed."
  • "Bion, following Freud, tells us that the caesura between present and future is not so great. The shadow of the future is present. So how can we read this shadow with Bion as a companion? We may see the future as consisting of many probable evolutions – like an infinite number of virtual lines, growth curves or probability lines only one of which is becoming real. Which lines will develop; which seeds will grow? And is our mind equipped to have an idea of this?"
  • "Depressed patients have been found to generate fewer anticipated positive future events, but most previous studies have included patients who have either been severely depressed or expressed suicidal thoughts and intents or both. The aim of this study was to compare positive and negative future-directed thinking in persons with mild to moderate depression who did not express suicidal thoughts or intents (n = 20) with a matched group of nondepressed persons (n = 20). Results showed that depressed persons reported lower scores regarding anticipated future positive events but they did not differ in terms of future negative events. The results are consistent with previous research and further strengthen the notion that reduced anticipation of future positive events is a defining characteristic of depression, even in the absence of suicidal ideation."
  • "Thirty years of work as a graphic facilitator listening visually to people in every kind of organization has convinced the author that visual intelligence is a key to navigating an information economy rich with multimedia. He also believes that theory and disciplines developed by practitioners in this new field hold special promise for educators and students learning the deeper grammar of visual language. This article shares conclusions drawn from the author's own extensive field experience, with links to work in process theory and cognitive science that have convinced him of the deeper potential of visualization as a path to building 21st-century cognitive skills."