• "The Parsons Journal for Information Mapping (PJIM) is a quarterly publication of the Parsons Institute for Information Mapping Opens link in new window. PJIM focuses on both the theoretical and practical aspects of information visualization and its disciplines. With each issue, the Journal aims to present novel ideas and approaches that advance the field of Knowledge Visualization through visual, engineering, and cognitive methods. PJIM publishes original essays, academic manuscripts, interactive and non-interactive projects, and project documentation. Our goal — shared by those submitting to the publication — is to disseminate knowledge on the theories and applications of information mapping, design, and visualization."
  • "Those engaged in strategic foresight, especially, face this twin problem when it comes to imagination: they must develop the skill to imagine wild card, outlier and other 9/11 -type scenarios, but must also manage and organize the potentially limitless number of such scenarios in manner as to make them intelligible and actionable. This article details a type of configuration space called a "scenario space," which helps those engaged in futuring and foresight processes to encourage and manage imagination. A scenario space is designed 1) to organize the imagination 2) to act as a diagnostic tool as to an organization's imaginative capacity and 3) to encourage imaginative thought and peripheral visioning."
  • Meeting spaces in London. Include warehouse conversion, Victorian and Georgian houses, artists' studios, loft conversions…. interesting bunch of spaces, though we seem to be falling into a moment with innovative space design where clean + kind of industrial + conversion = innovative. When so many of us work in spaces defined by comfort, clutter, and a dense bricolage of books and reprints and reports (not to mention the large invisible but even worse digital mess of emails, PDFs, attachments, PPTs, etc.), does this kind of space really hold the key to stimulating thinking? Or is it mainly easy to clean and maintain?
  • "[W]e really need to know about the difficulty of predicting the future. I don’t regard that as an indictment of expertise because expertise is clearly valuable, but let’s not misuse it. It’s not useful for making forecasts in any field really and certainly not in any field of social sciences."