• This paper compares government strategic planning in Singapore with that of the US, and examines the contextual differences that give rise to their divergent approaches. While Singapore does not enjoy the US' size advantage, the author argues that its approach is enabled as much by cultural, historical and geographical factors as it is by government willingness to invest in organizational innovation. He concludes with an assessment of what the two countries can learn from each other.
  • "When people think of knowledge, they generally think of two sorts of facts: facts that don’t change, like the height of Mount Everest or the capital of the United States, and facts that fluctuate constantly, like the temperature or the stock market close. But in between there is a third kind: facts that change slowly. These are facts which we tend to view as fixed, but which shift over the course of a lifetime."