• A new study by researchers at Carnegie-Mellon University, MIT, and Union College concludes that teams or groups have a collective form of intelligence, and this can be measured. The intelligence has little to do with the IQs of individual group members, but arises out of the interactions between the members. The researchers found that the performance of groups was not primarily due to the individual abilities of the group’s members. For instance, the average and maximum intelligence of individual group members did not significantly predict the performance of their groups overall. “Having a bunch of smart people in a group doesn’t necessarily make the group smart,” says MIT’s Thomas S. Malone. What makes a group smarter, then? Groups with equal levels of participation, whose members had higher levels of “social sensitivity,” were more collectively intelligent, the study finds. Interestingly, groups with more women tended to demonstrate higher intelligence, the study also finds.