• "[T]ime “between things” is being colonised. We walk less and less and our transit time, whether on foot, public transport or in a private vehicle, is increasingly mediated by our personal media. This time has become “entertainment time” or “productive time”–creating both benefits and costs…. Because our phones are with us everywhere all the time, and because competition is fierce for the lucrative markets it generates, the portable telephone’s capabilities and sophistication have developed rapidly…. In addition, for example, to the standard audio and video telephony, camera, GPS, Internet connectivity, instant messaging, movie and music player and games console, some phones include a torch. This convergence of technologies into one small and ubiquitous device is enabling new relationships between the individual mobile phone user and her physical, historical and social environment."
  • The Exploding The Frame article covers my first view of frameless filmmaking, which has now expanded from IMAX screens to include all viewing screens where there is high resolution, wide field views, and viewers standing or sitting closer than the width of the screen. The overview has held strong over the years, even as digital wall size displays, digital dome screens, and expansive desktop screens have come on the scene. The newer screens, like the huge IMAX canvas, require a new way of designing imagery and image sequences and are part of this new expansive cinematic language.
  • Despite the widespread use of social media by students and its increased use by instructors, very little empirical evidence is available concerning the impact of social media use on student learning and engagement. This paper describes our semester-long experimental study to determine if using Twitter… for educationally relevant purposes can impact college student engagement and grades…. [Twitter users] had a significantly greater increase in engagement than the [non-Tweeting] control group, as well as higher semester grade point averages. Analyses of Twitter communications showed that students and faculty were both highly engaged in the learning process in ways that transcended traditional classroom activities. This study provides experimental evidence that Twitter can be used as an educational tool to help engage students and to mobilize faculty into a more active and participatory role.
  • Students chatting on Twitter both inside and outside the classroom got higher grades than their nontweeting peers in a recent experiment conducted at a medium-size public institution in the Midwest. At the end of the semester, the tweeters had grade-point averages half a point higher, on average, than did their nontweeting counterparts. And students who tweeted were more engaged. Twitter users scored higher than those who didn’t use the tool on a 19-question student-engagement survey over the course of the semester—using parameters like how frequently students contributed to classroom discussion, and how often they interacted with their instructor about course material…. Twitter may be able to improve grades because it incorporates a feature into academic study that many students already use in their everyday lives—the “status update” that’s a part of Facebook.